New Year's Celebrations and Festivals around the world Detail

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New Year's Celebrations and Festivals around the world

  • 2017-12-31 11:17:01

New Year’s Day, which is on January 1st, marks the start of the year in the Gregorian calendar and it's a public holiday in many countries.List of some countries and their festivals given below.
1. New Year's Day in United Kingdom
New Year's Day is a public holiday in the United Kingdom on January 1st each year. It marks the start of the New Year in the Gregorian calendar. For many people have a quiet day on January 1st, which marks the end of the Christmas break before they return to work. However, there are some special custom, particularly in Scotland.
On New Year's Eve, many people turn on a television to see pictures of one of the four clocks on the Clock Tower on the Palace of Westminster, in London counting down the last minutes of the old year. At midnight, as the New Year begins, the chimes of Big Ben, the bell inside the Clock Tower, are broadcast to mark the start of the New Year. New Year's Day is a bank holiday. If January 1st is a Saturday or Sunday, the bank holiday falls on Monday, January 2nd or 3rd. Nearly all schools, large businesses and organizations are closed. In some areas stores may be open, although this varies a lot. Public transport systems do not usually run on their normal timetables. In general, public life shuts down completely on New Year's Day.
2. New Year's Day in Japan



New Year's is the most important traditional holiday celebrated in Japan. School closed on December 25, not because it was Christmas, but because this was the day that everyone, even children, was mobilized for the final, intense stage of preparations for New Year's.
First day of new year are important in Japanese culture and specifically the first sunrise of the year. Many people travel considerable distance up mountains and to other vantage points to see the first of the suns rays on the New Year. Some will also take advantage of the fresh start the New Year offers to make New Year’s resolutions similar to the western tradition.



Late on the evening of December 31, after all of these preparations were completed, everyone would eat a bowl of buckwheat noodles called toshikoshisoba ("year-crossing noodles") and listen for the sound of the Buddhist temple bells, which were rung 108 times at midnight. The sound of these bells is said to purify the listeners of the 108 sins or evil passions that plague every human being.
3. New Year's Day in Canada



January 1st is the first day of a new year. This date is commonly known as New Year's Day and is a statutory holiday in all Canadian provinces and territories.
Many people start January 1st at parties to welcome the New Year on the evening of December 31. Many parties are at people's homes or in bars and clubs. However, in some rural areas, particularly in the province of Quebec, some people spend the night ice fishing with groups of friends. Many New Year's Eve parties continue into the early hours of January 1st, so some people may spend most of the first day of the year recovering from the celebrations. Others take the opportunity to enjoy some time in the wintry Canadian landscape or to return home from their Christmas vacation.
January 1st is a statutory holiday in all Canadian provinces and territories and if this date falls on a Saturday or Sunday, the statutory holiday moves to Monday January 2nd or 3rd. Schools, post offices and many businesses and organizations are closed. In some areas, stores are closed, although this varies between provinces and even municipalities. Many public transport systems are shut down or offer a reduced service. January 2 is also a public holiday in the province of Quebec.
4. New Year's Eve in Turkey



New Year’s Eve is one of the most popular holidays in Turkey. The New Year’s Eve traditions in this country include a family dinner, a national lottery drawing and a countdown to midnight. New Year’s Eve falls on December 31 in the Gregorian calendar.
Many people in Turkey start celebrating New Year’s Eve with a large family dinner. The main course is traditionally a roasted turkey. Variety shows on television begin in late afternoon and continue until early morning of the next day. Many people play games while waiting for the clock to strike midnight.
New Year’s Eve is not an official holiday, although many workers get half a day off. Administration buildings, schools and post offices may be closed in the in the afternoon of December 31. Supermarkets may also close earlier than usual. Many people celebrate New Year’s Eve in city centers, so traffic may be intense in the evening of December 31.
5. New Year’s in Poland



New Year’s Eve is a festive occasion that is celebrated in Poland on December 31. It is the day before New Year’s Day, which is the first day of the year in the Gregorian calendar.
Fireworks are lit and seen in the skies above many cities in Poland around midnight between New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day. Many people toast drinks to farewell to the old year and welcome the New Year at this moment. It is also customary to wish friends and family a Happy New Year
New Year’s Eve is not an official public holiday in Poland, but it is a busy time of the year for many shops, restaurants, and other commercial businesses. Traffic may be heavy in some parts of the bigger cities and transport services may be busy, as many people travel to attend events or spend time with family and friends.
Many people in Poland and around the world celebrate New Year’s Eve on December 31 and New Year’s Day on January 1st in the Gregorian calendar.
Fireworks are lit to welcome the New Year at midnight between December 31 and January 1st.